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Posts Tagged ‘Congressional Republicans’

What a mess

July 28, 2011 Leave a comment

Less than two hours ago, I returned from a truly relaxing five-day trip to Harwich Port in Cape Cod.   Trying to actually enjoy a relaxing time, I tried as hard as I could to stay away from Mets baseball, the status of the NFL lockout, and more importantly, the debt ceiling negotiations on Capitol Hill.

As I was driving back earlier today, I realized that the Mets just swept a four-game series with the Reds, the lockout is officially over and…well, yeah.

The debt ceiling deadline has been staring Washington in the face since last year.  Neither President Obama nor the Democrats in Congress bothered to address the issue, even when they had their majorities in both chambers.  So of course, the big news today is that Speaker Boehner and the Republican leaders, not to mentioned the so-called Republican “conservatives” in the pundit class, are willing to shoot the Tea Party conservatives in the back of the head, figuratively speaking of course, in the name of waiting for 2012.  Or something.

Heckuva job guys. 

An update of today’s events here.

Astroturfing a non-existent “backlash” against Paul Ryan

April 29, 2011 Leave a comment

As Republicans in Congress use the Easter break to make their case for Paul Ryan’s entitlement reform to the American people, liberals would love it if constituents would start “raucous” town-hall meetings, a la the anti-Obamacare Tea Party events that took place during the summer of 2009.

Yes they would absolutely if that would happen.  Too bad for them, because it isn’t:

How did things go for Republicans in their initial defense of the Ryan budget?  Well, consider the intensity of the Left’s desire for an anti-GOP, anti-Ryan, “Town Hall Backlash” narrative. And then consider the relatively small number of “incidents” reported in the news, the sensational headlines that were never written.  [...]

It might be too soon to say Republicans are winning the budget debate, but they definitely aren’t losing it, and that’s a real slap in the face for liberals who were absolutely convinced that Americans would never accept a plan as bold as Ryan’s.

Meanwhile, look at this “outrage” at Paul Ryan’s most recent town-hall (via):

These people are outraged I say.  Outraged!

Will the House Republicans blink on spending cuts?

March 30, 2011 2 comments

It’s looking more and more likely.  But it’s still early, and the choice for the GOP is clear:

Congressional Democrats are holding out against substantive spending cuts, confident that they and the liberal mainstream media have so spooked Republicans with fear of “another government shutdown” that the GOP eventually will cave and settle either for minimal cuts or promises of a political fig leaf like a vote on a balanced budget amendment. [...]

Congressional Republicans have a choice to make. On the one hand, they can do what many of their leaders expect, which is to continue business as usual on Capitol Hill by agreeing to such a sham. That course will keep the country stumbling toward the fiscal disaster, economic ruin and national humiliation that inevitably result from such political irresponsibility.

But then I read stories about GOP leaders looking to cut deals with Blue Dog Democrats on bogus spending “cuts”, and I feel like pulling my hair out.

Elections have consequences for members of both parties.  If the message of the 2010 midterms wasn’t made clear to establishment Republicans (as well as Democrats), if the Tea Party didn’t give them a political smack upside the head, then I’m not sure what would.

A government shutdown is ok if you’re a Democrat

February 21, 2011 Leave a comment

The new meme for the looming budget fight in Congress is that Republicans are “clamoring” for a government shut-down, led by none other than Chucky Schumer.  Forget for a moment that you should consider what Schumer says a lie about ninety-nine percent of the time.

Democrats have no problems with government shutdowns.  The recent events in Wisconsin are a case in point:

…[I]f it’s so “reckless” to shutdown the government, why have Wisconsin legislators, the President and the DNC all supported the government shutdown in Wisconsin? Not only that, they have shutdown the government by fleeing the state and breaking the law, not to mention the illegal union strikes shutting down schools and national Democrats helping to organize the angry mob descending on Madison.

Excellent point by Mark Hemingway.  And what about the notion that a shut-down would be political poison for Republicans, as in 1996?  Maybe that won’t be the case this time around:

…[T]he budget crisis is much, much worse than it was in 1996 — Obama and Congressional Democrats added $4 trillion to the deficit in just over two years. I don’t think the magnitude of our current fiscal problems are lost on voters. And the more Congressional Democrats ratchet up the rhetoric towards the House GOP over the shutdown, the more they’re liable to be called out as rank hypocrites following right on heels of the Democratic temper tantrum in Wisconsin. 

Hypocrites you say?  Yes, I’d say that.

UPDATE.  A Memeorandum thread.

Senator Jon Kyl retiring

February 10, 2011 Leave a comment

The number two Republican in the Senate is calling it quits:

Three-term Sen. Jon Kyl will announce his retirement at a noon ET news conference Thursday in Phoenix, two Republican sources confirmed to Fox News.

The Arizona lawmaker, the No. 2 Republican in the Senate, will be the fifth senator scheduled for re-election next year to announce a departure from Congress in 2012.

Kyl, 68, served four terms in the House before winning a Senate seat. In 2006, he was named one of the 10 best senators by Time Magazine.

That leaves, I believe, John Cornyn and Lamar Alexander for the number two slot.

Be wary of politicians bearing committees

January 20, 2011 Leave a comment

So Europe sets up an oversight committee called the ESRB to make recommendations and assess the financial markets in order to prevent the next financial crisis.  What a brilliant idea!  It’s a shame nobody ever came up with that idea before.

Too bad though, as the ESRB, like most bureaucratic self-congratulating committees will probably do nothing to stop whatever it is it was created to prevent.

Bloomberg:

The European Systemic Risk Board, which aims to identify and warn of brewing risks in the financial system, may fail to prevent future imbalances as it doesn’t have any legal power to enforce action, according to economists at ING Group,Barclays Capital and ABN Amro. [...]

“The problem is that these bodies are set up to solve yesterday’s problems,” said Peter Hahn, a former Citigroup Inc. banker who lectures on finance at Cass Business School in London. “They can never do more than flagging any issues,” and whether they can stop a crisis “is questionable.”

The European Union is trying to avoid a repeat of the financial crisis that followed the 2008 collapse of Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. and resulted in European governments setting aside more than $5 trillion to support banks. Part of a wider regulatory overhaul, the ESRB is similar to the Financial Stability Oversight Council in the U.S.

“The idea is excellent, but if the thing is not going to have any teeth, it is not going to be good enough,” said Nick Kounis, an economist at ABN Amro Bank NV in Amsterdam.

The piece is talking about financial markets, but you can substitute any other issue–healthcare reform, the housing market, whatever.  The point is that politicians and bureaucrats will always make themselves seem more important than they really are.  They do that by forming “committees” to oversee this or that emergency to make it appear as if they’re on the case and working to protect you–the citizen.  Meanwhile, they do it only to justify their political existence.

Like the article suggests, more likely than not, their actions will do little if anything to prevent said problems.  In fact, they can make it worse.  So remember that the next time politicians (Republican or Democrat) tell us not to worry, that they’re on top of things and forming committees and whatnot.

More like Congressman Allen West please

January 2, 2011 Leave a comment

Happy New Year to all my loyal readers anyone who’s reading this!

The 112th Congress will be sworn in in three days, and although I try never to put too much faith in any politician, there are glimmers of hope and optimism in this class, Tea Party conservatives and all.

Primary among them has to be Allen West, who was interviewed by the New York Times Magazine, which ran it this morning.  This is what I’m talking about:

Do you consider President Obama a good leader?
Not really.

[...]

Even though you’re a Republican, did you feel a sense of pride when President Obama was elected?
I don’t look to a man to get pride in myself. It’s not about having a black president, it’s about having a good president, and I think that’s the most important thing. This country needs a good leader, and I don’t care if he’s purple or green but yes, there are some people that saw in him a sense of pride.

You don’t necessarily hear a lot about people like Alan West in the media and such, because people like him scare the bejeezus out of the left.  See, in their world, African-Americans are only supposed to be mindless Democrats.

Read the whole interview, it’s short and sweet.  Very sweet.  We need more Republicans like Allen West. Period.

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