Home > World News > “Qaddafi has better weapons”

“Qaddafi has better weapons”

France and England are making noise about bombing Libya and/or establishing a no-fly zone, respectively.  Both countries want “action” in North Africa, but there’s a lot of hand-wringing as to what that action will be.   One thing is clear, though.  The EU has spoken:

An EU summit call today for Gaddafi to “relinquish power immediately” is seen as vital for helping to win support from Arab League meeting of foreign ministers on Saturday.  […]

William Hague, the foreign secretary said that Britain was happy to talk to the council, but stopped well short of recognition. A letter written by Mr Hague yesterday urged the EU to strip Gaddafi of diplomatic recognition.

“The EU and its member states will not work or co-operate with Gaddafi [and should] support the suspension of Gaddafi’s sovereign immunity, removing from him the protection enjoyed by heads of state,” he wrote.

Meanwhile, it’s becoming apparent that the rebels’ inexperience and lack of weaponry appears to be making all the difference as Libya explodes into civil war:

“We have God on our side and a just cause, but Qaddafi has better weapons,” says Sarhan Khaled, a 34-year-old businessman who has been fighting just west of the oil town of Ras Lanuf for the past four days. “We’ll fight either way, but we’d like the international community to stop his planes.”

This afternoon NATO is considering a no-fly zone to protect the uprising – something the rebels have been begging for – and economic sanctions have been heaped on Qaddafi and his associates. […]

[E]vents today show that consideration of further moves could soon become moot.

Late Thursday afternoon some of the largely civilian militia at the forefront of the uprising against Qaddafi’s 41-year reign started to withdraw from Ras Lanuf after a withering assault by mortars, rocket fire, and warplanes over the past two days.

After pummeling the rebel positions from the air, forces loyal to Qaddafi maneuvered in the desert south of the lightly armed rebels, who are generally visible in large clusters along the highway, to attack them from their flank. As of this writing, the town appeared to remain in rebel hands, albeit shakily.

Today’s assault, to be sure, involved far more than planes. Though the rebels have rockets, they have had difficulty locating Qaddafi’s forces and are generally unskilled operators. That means that Qaddafi’s forces have been able to rain mortars and rockets on the area with little fear of reprisals.

Does anyone else think that the EU’s chest-thumping is falling on deaf ears?  Does anyone believe that Qaddafi is taking them seriously?  I’m trying to think otherwise, but there’s really no convincing information to the contrary.

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