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Posts Tagged ‘New Jersey politics’

A Garden State message to President Obama

July 1, 2011 Leave a comment

Seen in south Jersey:

Clearly not indicative of the rest of the state to be sure.  But we never would have seen this in the Hope ‘N Change days of 2008.

Governor Christie propses pulling Jersey out of onerous cap and trade program

May 26, 2011 Leave a comment

The governor is proposing pulling out of the voluntary RGGI program, which is a voluntary state cap-and-trade program.

Good riddance.  The program is quickly becoming a cess pool of political corruption (surprise!), meanwhile our state has seen New Jersey companies pick up and leave because of higher energy costs due to the program, among other concerns.

Wasn’t cap-and-trade supposed to be good for businesses?

Illinois at the fiscal precipice

January 3, 2011 Leave a comment

You can add the Land of Lincoln to the list of states that are in dire straits:

Illinois lawmakers will try this week to accomplish in a few days what they have been unable to do in the past two years — resolve the state’s worst financial crisis.

The legislative session that began today as the House convened will take aim at a budget deficit of at least $13 billion, including a backlog of more than $6 billion in unpaid bills and almost $4 billion in missed payments to underfunded state pensions.

The fiscal mess is largely of the lawmakers’ own making, and failure to address the shortages threatens public schools, local governments and other public services, said Dan Hynes, the state’s outgoing comptroller.

“We’ve reached a very critical and concerning point,” Hynes said in an interview in his Chicago office, with packing boxes stacked in the corner. “What’s missing right now is a general understanding by the public of where we are, of how bad it is, and what the fallout would be if we don’t deal with it properly.”

[…]

Bill Gross, who runs the world’s biggest bond fund at Pacific Investment Management Co. in Newport Beach, California, said Illinois was one of the states whose debt he would avoid.

“Illinois is probably in the worst shape,” Gross said in a Dec. 28 interview on CNBC.

The widening gap between Illinois’s expenses and revenue drew criticism from Moody’s. The disparity underscored the state’s “chronic unwillingness to confront a long-term, structural budget deficit,” it said in a Dec. 29 study.

Here in New Jersey, Governor Christie has spent the better part of a year tackling our fiscal problems head on, and not by skirting around the edges of the problem, but engaging them head on.  For that he has ticked off the right people  drawn the ire of the national media, left-leaning bloggers and pundits, and quite frankly, people who don’t know any better. 

He has directly and intentionally taken on the public-sector unions that at this point are nothing more than parasites on the financial well-being of our state.  And even then, it might not be enough to turn us around from the mess that 12+ years of Democratic “fiscal” policy have left the Garden State.

Looks like Illinois needs their own Chris Christie.  And from the looks of things, I won’t hold my breath.

Christmas with Governor Christie

December 13, 2010 Leave a comment

Governor Christie, with help from the Boston Pops, reads ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas

WP doesn’t allow embedding of this video format, so click-through the link and enjoy.

New Jersey has true leadership

November 4, 2010 Leave a comment

Governor Christie has announced that 1,200 public jobs will be trimmed from the state payroll before the end of the year.

More importantly, the Christie administration is making the case for businesses and private sector growth in the state, something that has been trailing off over the last decade or so:

Christie cited a new report out by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, which predicted New Jersey’s economy will grow by more than 4 percent in the next six months, a projection based on increased building permits and a drop in new unemployment claims.

Christie said reduced government expenses have prompted businesses to begin thinking about expanding again in New Jersey, and that will grow the state’s economy.

The governor also noted that many municipalities are struggling to put together budgets for the next year, and he said reducing public employee costs were a key to controlling property taxes and helping the private sector.

Restraining the cost of salaries, restraining the cost of benefits, is one way of doing that; layoffs are another way,” Christie said. “Government is too big in New Jersey. You’ve seen that in the time we’ve been in office, a 4.6 percent reduction in government jobs, and there may have to be more.”

Part of the reason that liberals and Democrats across the country loathe Governor Christie is because he’s not waiting around, genuflecting before President Obama, begging the Federal government for some lame stimulus package.  He’s being proactive about the problems that are facing us here in New Jersey, and makes no apologies for that.

Suffice it to say that the actions he’s taking would never have happened under the Corzine regime.

Election Day Eve in NJ-6

November 1, 2010 1 comment

It’s still an uphill battle for Anna Little, going up against 11 term congressman Frank Pallone, but the race has received some increased media attention over the past few weeks, and polls are showing a tightening race.

Republicans are headed for a huge victory tomorrow with gains all over the map. That makes seemingly impossible races like NJ-6 within reach.  At a rally a few weeks ago, Governor Christie said that it would be a shame if we wake up on November 3rd to see candidates like Anna Little miss out by a few points, just because voters felt as if they had no choice or no chance.

This past Saturday, I was at a Halloween/birthday party and I was talking with a fellow district resident.  We started talking politics and she asked what I knew about Anna Little, and she had only heard about her over the past few weeks.   When our conversation was over, I asked her to relay my words of wisdom to others who had decided to sit the election out.   Who knows what will come of that, but the point is every little bit will help.

Anna Little will be appearing with Governor Christie tonight for a last GOTV rally in Middletown NJ at Bachstadt’s Tavern, 8 Bray Avenue, from 7-9 PM.  Make it out there if you can, bring people who might be interested or see what you can do to help in the last few hours before election day.

If you think we’ve done enough, think again.  There’s always more to be done.

Anna Little For Congress

NJ-6: Monmouth University poll shows Pallone losing ground to Little

October 26, 2010 Leave a comment

Several weeks ago, RCP moved this race from Safe Dem to Lean Dem. 

Earlier today, Jim Geraghty wrote that Charlie Cook has now moved New Jersey’s 6th CD to Likely Dem as well.

Today, the Asbury Park Press and the Star Ledger are both reporting that the latest Monmouth University poll shows Anna Little gaining ground, narrowing Frank Pallone’s lead from twelve to seven points.  The APP writes:

In the Monmouth County portion of the district, Little leads Pallone 52 to 45 percent. Three weeks ago, Pallone led Little by 49 to 47 percent. Pallone continues to hold a sizable 58 to 37 percent lead in the other parts of the district, including urban strongholds in Middlesex and Union counties.

 Pallone’s job performance approval rating among likely voters is 45 percent, virtually the same as three weeks ago, when it was 46 percent. His job performance disapproval rating has gone up from 36 to 46 percent, however.

 More voters are now aware of Little: only 31 percent said they have no opinion of her, down from 45 percent three weeks ago.

Last week I wrote:

[…] worth noting is that 45% of respondents said they had “no opinion” of Anna Little.  In other words, voters in the district really don’t know much about her.  Voters here feel they don’t really have much of a choice, that it’s just automatic for Pallone to win.  That’s not good for democracy.  […]

Turnout will be key to turn this district red, plain and simple.  With a 12 point deficit and two weeks left, the campaign will certainly have its work cut out for it.  It will be difficult, but not impossible. 

This is what happens when voters begin to realize that they have a choice, and they have the power to break the vise grip of lethargic incumbency.  This is what GOTV efforts are all about.  In a matter of weeks, support at the grassroots level in the Little campaign has taken a virtually unknown candidate to within striking distance of a 22-year incumbent Democrat, comfortable in his blue district.

Speaking as a Mets fan, all I can say is: you gotta believe!

UPDATE.  It appears that the sample used in the Monmouth University poll might be skewing what’s really going on in NJ-6:

The poll […] could underestimate Little’s performance. The Monmouth University poll’s sample was 40 percent Democrats, 22 percent Republicans and 38 percent Independents. […]

In 2006 the Republican sample was 28 percent (a depressed year for Republicans nation wide, but especially dower in the North East) and the independent Sample was 31 percent. In 2008 the Republican sample was 33 percent and the independent sample was 38 percent.

It is fairly dubious assertion that this year will yield fewer Republicans at the polls than even 2006. It is even more suspicious that 38 percent of the Monmouth University poll’s sample is 38 percent; this independent sample outperforms their best year by 7 points. For a particularly good Republican year, when both the GOP and Democratic bases were engaged, 2004 is a decent place to start.
 
If you adjust the sample of 647 likely voters (257 Democrats, 141 Republican and 249 Independents) to reflect the exit polls from 2004, (253 Democrats, 201 Republicans and 194 Independents) then the race becomes 51 to 49 percent for Pallone. This is a minor adjustment from Monmouth University’s findings for Pallone but a major boost for Little. It also puts this race within the margin of error for most pollsters.
 
Stay tuned…

 

NJ-6: Anna Little closing in on Pallone?

October 19, 2010 1 comment

Take it for what it’s worth, but a National Research poll is giving Anna Little’s campaign some juice:

Gov. Chris Christie campaigned with Tea Party-endorsed 6th District challenger Anna Little last night in Piscataway and intends to campaign again with her later this week. Christie has some inside intel on the race from his favorite pollster.

Republican numbers cruncher Adam Geller of National Research, Inc. shows Republican challenger Little with a shot to win in her challenge of a vulnerable U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone (D-Long Branch).

Commissioned by the Little campaign, Geller puts Pallone ahead of Little by one point, 44-43%, in a survey Geller conducted from Oct. 5-6.

I’m too ignorant to figure out how much weight to give that poll.  I mean really, Frank Pallone.  Up by only 1 point? 

Jim Geraghty cautions:

This is a D+8 district, and Pallone usually wins by wide margins — with 67 percent in 2008, 69 percent in 2006, 67 percent in 2004, 66 percent in 2002. One of the reasons I had never put this race terribly high on my list of competitive contests is Pallone’s gargantuan financial advantage. As of September 30, he has more than $4.2 million cash on hand (a side effect of his interest in running statewide for a long while) while Little’s financial resources align with her surname, a little over $109,000 cash on hand as of October 13.

A poll like this one, commissioned by Little, might get Pallone to dip into his considerable cash reserves to ensure his traditional advantage. (After Christie carried his district, Pallone would be a fool to take his reelection for granted.) But if Pallone really is at 35 percent in his job-approval rating, as the Little poll suggests, then perhaps all the money in the world can’t persuade his constituents to keep him.

I stick by my initial take on this race–it will be tough, but not impossible.  If Little could pull this off, it would be a coup of ginormous proportions. 

(H/T: Ace)

Governor Christie, social and fiscal conservative

October 19, 2010 Leave a comment

New Jersey politics has been the focus of my last few posts, so why stop now?

The Newark Star-Ledger reports:

Two weeks ago, the federal government awarded Gov. Chris Christie’s administration nearly $4.7 million in federal funding for teenage pregnancy prevention programs. But one-fifth of the money comes with one unbreakable string attached.

Nearly $1 million must be spent teaching kids to say no to premarital sex.

New Jersey had not sought abstinence funding since shortly after Democratic Gov. Jon Corzine took office in 2006, and he stopped competing for it the following year, said Michele Jaker, executive director of Planned Parenthood Affiliates of New Jersey. “We were among the first states to stop,” she said.

The decision to pursue abstinence funding didn’t get much attention as Christie carved himself a national reputation as a fiscal conservative. But it is the latest sign the governor is also beginning to pursue a socially conservative agenda, according to some advocacy groups from both the left and right, lawmakers and political scientists.

[…]

“Governor Christie is our first pro-life governor,” said Marie Tasy, executive director of New Jersey Right to Life. “He is trying very hard to fix our state and restore our culture from the bad decisions and failed policies of previous administrations so that it will be a better place to raise our children and future generations.”

Social conservatives had eyed Christie warily as a gubernatorial candidate, questioning the sincerity of his conversion from being pro-abortion-rights to anti-abortion in the mid-1990s after becoming a father.

All of this, of course, doesn’t stop the extremism:

Sen. Loretta Weinberg (D-Bergen) said the change in state health policy “is not pretty.”

“Between the cuts in funding access to birth control and applying for abstinence education, somehow we have people caught somewhere in the last century mentally,” she said.

Yeah.  Who would’ve thought that teaching personal responsibility to teenagers and kids was a “last-century” concept?  That,  instead of the incessant funding of abortions and unlimited condoms on the back of taxpayers and at the expense of being able to teach their own children.  What a novel idea.

Over the past few weeks, I’ve heard some concern-trolling on behalf of conservative commentators and others, that Christie is not really a conservative for any number of reasons– he supported Mike Castle in the Delaware Senate race, or his position on immigration reform, etc.

To that I say, wake up!   Dare I say that Chris Christie is as conservative a governor as New Jersey will get in probably my lifetime.  That he’s willing to bring his fiscal conservative ideals to fruition in the Garden State is more than what most voters imagined.   For conservatives, that he wasn’t trumpeting his social conservative beliefs shouldn’t be so much of an issue, at least not in New Jersey, where fiscal matters were primarily on the minds of most voters.  It doesn’t really matter anyway, as he’s speaking with actions and not words.

That’s what’s key.

NJ-6: Governor Christie speech for Anna Little (VIDEO)

October 18, 2010 Leave a comment

Chris Christie’s speech at yesterday’s campaign rally for the Little campaign are available on YouTube in two separate videos.

Here’s the first part, which includes the portion from the clip that I posted yesterday:

Part two is important as the Governor implores the grassroots to remain active and most importantly, to get out and vote:

My original post on the rally is here.

Anna Little for Congress